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Management of wounds in a loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) caused by traumatic bycatch injury from the spines of a spotted eagle ray (Aetobatus narinari).
J Zoo Wildl Med. 2014 Jun; 45(2):428-32.JZ

Abstract

A subadult female loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) was caught in a trawl net off the west coast of Florida with a spotted eagle ray (Aetobatus narinari) spine lodged in the left stifle. Surgical removal of the spine was performed and antibiotic treatment was initiated. Four weeks later, endoscopy revealed a second spine entering an intestinal lumen. The fistulous tract of the left prefemoral fossa was surgically excised and the intestinal perforation was repaired. Dehiscence occurred and a vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) system was used on the wound for approximately 18 days to help reduce infection and increase the rate of healing. The left stifle wound was treated to heal by second intention. The turtle remained in rehabilitation for 19 mo before being released off the west coast of Florida. This case describes stingray envenomation injuries as a complex and potentially life-threatening bycatch effect to sea turtles caught in trawl nets.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25000714

Citation

Bezjian, Marisa, et al. "Management of Wounds in a Loggerhead Sea Turtle (Caretta Caretta) Caused By Traumatic Bycatch Injury From the Spines of a Spotted Eagle Ray (Aetobatus Narinari)." Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine : Official Publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians, vol. 45, no. 2, 2014, pp. 428-32.
Bezjian M, Wellehan JF, Walsh MT, et al. Management of wounds in a loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) caused by traumatic bycatch injury from the spines of a spotted eagle ray (Aetobatus narinari). J Zoo Wildl Med. 2014;45(2):428-32.
Bezjian, M., Wellehan, J. F., Walsh, M. T., Anderson, E., & Jacobson, E. (2014). Management of wounds in a loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) caused by traumatic bycatch injury from the spines of a spotted eagle ray (Aetobatus narinari). Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine : Official Publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians, 45(2), 428-32.
Bezjian M, et al. Management of Wounds in a Loggerhead Sea Turtle (Caretta Caretta) Caused By Traumatic Bycatch Injury From the Spines of a Spotted Eagle Ray (Aetobatus Narinari). J Zoo Wildl Med. 2014;45(2):428-32. PubMed PMID: 25000714.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Management of wounds in a loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) caused by traumatic bycatch injury from the spines of a spotted eagle ray (Aetobatus narinari). AU - Bezjian,Marisa, AU - Wellehan,James F X,Jr AU - Walsh,Michael T, AU - Anderson,Eric, AU - Jacobson,Elliott, PY - 2014/7/9/entrez PY - 2014/7/9/pubmed PY - 2014/7/25/medline SP - 428 EP - 32 JF - Journal of zoo and wildlife medicine : official publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians JO - J Zoo Wildl Med VL - 45 IS - 2 N2 - A subadult female loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) was caught in a trawl net off the west coast of Florida with a spotted eagle ray (Aetobatus narinari) spine lodged in the left stifle. Surgical removal of the spine was performed and antibiotic treatment was initiated. Four weeks later, endoscopy revealed a second spine entering an intestinal lumen. The fistulous tract of the left prefemoral fossa was surgically excised and the intestinal perforation was repaired. Dehiscence occurred and a vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) system was used on the wound for approximately 18 days to help reduce infection and increase the rate of healing. The left stifle wound was treated to heal by second intention. The turtle remained in rehabilitation for 19 mo before being released off the west coast of Florida. This case describes stingray envenomation injuries as a complex and potentially life-threatening bycatch effect to sea turtles caught in trawl nets. SN - 1042-7260 UR - http://bjp.sagepub.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25000714/Management_of_wounds_in_a_loggerhead_sea_turtle__Caretta_caretta__caused_by_traumatic_bycatch_injury_from_the_spines_of_a_spotted_eagle_ray__Aetobatus_narinari__ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1638/2013-0178R.1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -